Bar Exam Scoring: What It Means And Why It Matters

How is the Uniform Bar Exam Scored? | The Uniform Bar Exam consists of three parts: The Multistate Essay Examination (MEE), the Multistate Performance Test (MPT) portion, and the Multistate Bar Exam (MBE).

The Uniform Bar Exam is broken into three parts: The Multistate Essay Examination (MEE) , the Multistate Performance Test (MPT) portion, and the Multistate Bar Exam (MBE). The three parts of

In short, the score breakdown of the Uniform Bar Exam is as follows:

  • The MBE is worth 50%
  • The MEE is worth 30%
  • The MPT is worth 20%

Each part of the Uniform Bar Exam is explored in more detail below.

Section 1: The Multistate Essay Examination (MEE)

Section 2: The Multistate Performance Test (MPT)

Section 3: The Multistate Bar Exam (MBE)

You can see the MEE topics for the 2016-2017 examinee here. The MEE is scored based on a

Four-point scale based on a set of guidelines you can read here: Four-point Scale for the Uniform Bar Exam

The Scoring System

The Multistate Essay Examination (MEE) is graded on a 4-point scale. The minimum passing score is 163 points, and the maximum passing score is 190 points.

See also: Dialect Vs. Accent: What’s the Difference and Which One Is More Important?

The Multistate Performance Test (MPT) is graded on a 2-point scale. The minimum passing score is 120 points, and the maximum passing score is 140 points.

The Multistate Performance Test (MPT) is graded on a 3-point scale. The minimum passing score is 100 points, and the maximum passing score is 125 points.

The Multistate Performance Test (MPT) portion

Part 1: The Multistate Essay Examination (MEE) is an all-important component of the Uniform Bar Exam, but the scoring of the test is complex and controversial.

The Multistate Essay Examination is similar to the GRE, but it’s not a standardized test. Not everyone agrees on how the MEE should be scored.

And there are many aspects of the MEE scoring process that haven’t been evaluated. There’s a ton of

Uniform Bar Examination (UBE) Committee

discussion here.

Opinions vary on the mechanics of how the MEE is scored.

The Uniform Bar Examination (UBE) Committee (MEE section) receives proposal from the ABA Counseling and Testing Center. The MEE Section writes a scoring policy that the MEE Board of Directors adopts.

The Multistate Bar Exam (MBE)

make up the four “levels” of the Uniform Bar Examination. Each test is scored on a scale of zero to three points. Each test covers a variety of subjects that the MBE examiner (one of the attorneys who administer the MBE in each state) must grade and rank from 1 to 60, depending on the subject and the student’s performance.

The subject matter and the student’s performance are weighted equally for the MEE and MPT (the test is not divided into parts). While the MEE and MPT are scored the same way, the MBE is scored on a scale from 0 to 40.

All students must take and pass the MEE and MPT in order to take the MBE. Once the MEE and MPT scores are calculated, the MBE scores are calculated as well. In order to pass the MBE, a student must score at least 3 on either the MEE or MPT.

How is the MBE Scored?

Upon taking the Multistate Essay Examination (MEE), attorneys must submit a one-paragraph essay addressing the following questions: 1. Why did you choose the area of law you practiced? 2. What factors helped make your choice? 3. How would you describe your work experience? 4. What is your plan for the future? 5. How do you see your future career development? 6. Describe any changes to the law recently proposed or under consideration? 7. Why do you choose to practice in this particular area of the law? 8. What do you believe makes your current practice unique? 9. What concerns do you have with the future of the profession? 10. What are your concerns about the profession as it exists today? 11. What could the profession do to improve its future? 12.

The Importance of the MBE

The MBE portion covers more topics than the other parts of the exam. The MBE test consists of four different examination stages. The first stage, with a total of 54 multiple choice questions, tests for basic knowledge of the legal field. Questions test for the judge’s ability to understand the different legal principles of the U.S. and other countries.

The next stage, which consists of 18 questions, tests reasoning and the ability to think in abstract terms and solve problems. Questions include reasoning for and against statutory interpretation and for and against jury instructions and rules of evidence.

The last stage, with a total of 46 questions, consists of five multiple choice and six true/false questions.

Conclusion

If you are really looking to pass the Uniform Bar Exam, you need to pay close attention to these three factors.

For those trying to decide which states are the most favorable to pass the Uniform Bar Exam, here are the states with the highest and lowest passing scores.

Updated on February 20th, 2018

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3. Employment Opportunities

Here are two good resources for finding a job:

Personal Resources

“60 Other Interesting Facts about the Bar Exam”

Personal Resources

Here is a list of the states that require bar applicants to pass the Multistate Essay Examination and the Multistate Performance Test (MPT) portion of the Uniform Bar Exam.