A Guide to the Procedure of a Partial Circumcision

By | October 18, 2022

Partial circumcision is also known as super-high cut or high cut procedure. The procedure involves removing just the prepuce (the loose foreskin covering the head of the penis) and not the entire foreskin. A This leaves a band of skin connecting the root of the penis with its tip.

It, therefore, results in a smaller area of residual foreskin than that after complete removal. An additional advantage is that it is better hidden and reduces chances of exposure during swimming or other activities.

In this article, we will look at what a partial circumcision involves, its advantages and disadvantages, who can undergo this procedure, pre- and postoperative care, potential risks and recuperation time.

What is the procedure for a partial circumcision?

The procedure for partial circumcision follows the same basic steps as for a complete circumcision, with a few minor variations. This circumcision may be performed under local anaesthesia, as this is generally easier to tolerate than general anaesthesia. After cleaning the area and administering the anaesthetic, the surgeon will make an incision in the skin where the foreskin and penis meet.

The incision will extend from the end of the foreskin to about half-way along the shaft of the penis, stopping just before the shaft widens. The loose skin and the foreskin will be pulled away from the underlying shaft.

The surgeon will then carefully remove the outer layer of the foreskin, taking care not to damage the inner layer, which is the skin of the shaft. The surgeon will then stitch the incision, usually using a combination of stitches and glue to secure the wound.

 

 

The different styles of circumcision - Dr Kuehhas

 

 

 

Why is partial circumcision not recommended?

Partial circumcision is not recommended because it is a risky procedure and does not have any proven medical benefits. Also, there is no proof that partial removal of the foreskin will reduce the risks of acquiring specific diseases or conditions.

As with standard circumcision, partial circumcision involves surgical removal of some or all of the prepuce (also known as the ‘foreskin’). However, unlike standard circumcision which removes almost all of the skin covering the tip of the penis, partial circumcision leaves more tissue in place.

It may involve removing only the inner layer (the mucosal membrane) or leaving a band of skin on top, but removing part or all of the outer layer (the remaining loose skin on top and underneath) . If you want to learn more about Partial Circumcision.

What does a partial circumcision involve?

The procedure for partial circumcision follows the same basic steps as for a complete circumcision, with a few minor variations. A partial circumcision may be performed under local anaesthesia, as this is generally easier to tolerate than general anaesthesia. After cleaning the area and administering the anaesthetic, the surgeon will make an incision in the skin where the foreskin and penis meet.

The incision will extend from the end of the foreskin to about half-way along the shaft of the penis, stopping just before the shaft widens.

The loose skin and the foreskin will be pulled away from the underlying shaft. The surgeon will then carefully remove the outer layer of the foreskin, taking care not to damage the inner layer, which is the skin of the shaft. The surgeon will then stitch the incision, usually using a combination of stitches and glue to secure the wound.

Advantages of Partial Circumcision

– Partial circumcision is likely to cause less bleeding and bruising than complete removal of the foreskin. This can be particularly important in children and adolescents, who are more likely to have a low blood clotting tendency. This circumcision results in less pain than complete removal of the foreskin, while there is often no difference in discomfort between the two procedures in adults.

– The risk of complications, such as infection, is lower in partial circumcision than in complete removal of the foreskin.

– Partial circumcision can be performed in the doctor’s office without requiring hospital admission.

– Partial circumcision can be performed in the office using local anaesthesia, which means that children and people with certain health conditions may be able to undergo this procedure without being put under general anaesthesia.

– Partial circumcision has a shorter recovery period than complete removal of the foreskin.

Disadvantages of Partial Circumcision

– Partial circumcision is more expensive than complete removal of the foreskin.

– Partial circumcision is more likely to result in damage to the penis than complete removal of the foreskin. – Partial circumcision makes sex less pleasurable for both partners.

Who can undergo Partial Circumcision?

Partial circumcision is suitable for males with a low risk of disease when the foreskin is left intact, such as newborns and young children. It could also be performed on adults who have a high risk of diseases linked to a foreskin, or men who suffer from a medical condition that prevents them from undergoing complete removal of the foreskin.

It is commonly performed on children aged between 4 and 12 years old, although in some cases it may be performed on infants as young as 3 months old. It is also performed in people with certain medical conditions that inhibit full removal of the foreskin.

Pre-operative Care and Conditions for Partial Circumcision

– The patient must inform the doctor if he has any allergies or if he is taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines. The doctor will then determine whether there is any reason why the patient should not undergo the procedure.

– Young patients must be able to sit upright without assistance. – Patients must be in good health, without any underlying medical conditions.

Potential Risks of Partial Circumcision

– Bleeding is the most common risk associated with partial circumcision. While it is rare, bleeding can usually be controlled with pressure. Severe bleeding, however, may lead to blood clotting disorders, inflammation and other complications.

– Infection: The skin is a very porous organ and is thus highly susceptible to infections. Infections are most often caused by an unhygienic environment, improper method of cleaning the wound, and an imbalanced immune system.

– Changes in appearance: Partial circumcision is generally less visible than a complete removal of the foreskin. However, the procedure may cause irregularities in the shape and colour of the remaining foreskin.

– Changes in sensitivity: Decreased sensitivity in the glans is a common side-effect of partial circumcision, especially when performed at a young age.

Conclusion

A partial circumcision is a common procedure that can be performed to treat a variety of conditions. It is less invasive than a complete removal of the foreskin and has fewer risks of complications, such as infection. It can also be performed in the office using local anaesthesia, which means that children and people with certain health conditions may be able to undergo this procedure without being put under general anaesthesia.

While this circumcision is a less intensive procedure than a complete removal of the foreskin, it is important to note that it also places less emphasis on hygiene. Partial circumcision is often performed on young children and individuals with certain medical conditions, both of whom are less likely to practice proper hygiene.

Thus, it is important for parents and guardians to monitor the hygiene habits of the person who underwent a partial circumcision, and to remind them to clean the area properly.

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