Why Autoregulation is Important for Your Oral Health

By | October 20, 2022

Everyone has different reactions to stress, anxiety, and other mental and physical stimuli. Some people are more susceptible to stress than others. This is why it is also important for you to know about autoregulation in your oral health.

If you have been reading our blog for some time now, you probably already know that excess stress can be detrimental to your health.

It induces the release of the hormone cortisol which has negative effects on your body  leading to things like weight gain, high blood pressure, and a weakened immune system.

When you think about the human body and its functions, you probably think about how some things are automatic. Your heart beats on its own; your lungs breathe without you having to tell them when; your stomach digests food without you needing to give instructions on when and how much to eat, and so forth.

There is also a great deal of self-regulation. Your body is able to adapt to different conditions and make adjustments accordingly. For example, if you go on a hike in hot weather, your body will naturally sweat more in order to cool down.

If you get thirsty, your body naturally produces saliva so that you can start drinking again as soon as possible. Unfortunately, not all our systems are this self-sufficient – particularly not when it comes to the oral cavity.

In fact, many of these processes seem to be very much dependent on our active participation for optimal functionality. But what does that mean? And why does this matter for your oral health? Here are some answers…

What is Autoregulation?

Autoregulation is the process by which a certain system in the body adapts itself automatically to changing conditions. It is a self-regulating system that responds to stimuli in its environment.

For example, your heart rate is regulated by your nervous system and is connected to how much oxygen and sugar your muscles need. The oral environment is a self-regulating system.

This means that it constantly adapts to changing conditions in order to maintain a certain standard of health. The oral mucosa, for instance, is a self-regulating system.

It is constantly adapting itself to protect you from pathogens and other harmful substances in your environment. A few examples of oral self-regulation include salivary flow, flow of fluids in the oral cavity, and gingival (gum) swelling.

The Importance of Oral Self-Regulation

Although each of these oral self-regulating processes is important for our oral health, salivary flow is perhaps the most important of them all.

Saliva is a very important part of your oral health, and if you don’t produce enough of it, your oral health may suffer immensely. The oral cavity is a highly acidic environment.

Bacteria thrive in acidic environments, and plaque is no exception. Plaque is a build-up of bacteria, food remnants (that have not been properly removed), and other debris that can lead to dental disease.

This is why we need to remove it regularly. For this to happen, we need a healthy flow of saliva in our mouths.

Saliva is an essential part of the plaque removal process because it is a mild antibacterial substance that also has a natural buffering effect that helps to maintain the pH of the oral cavity.

Why is Self-regulation Important for Oral Health?

As we’ve seen, each of the self-regulating processes in the oral cavity is important for oral health. However, if we look at salivary flow and its effects on oral health, it becomes clear why self-regulation is so important.

Salivary flow is directly related to the amount of work being done in the mouth. This means that if you are eating a very soft food or chewing on a very soft food, you will produce less saliva. On the other hand, if you are eating something firmer, such as a steak, you are likely to produce more saliva.

Self-regulating Processes in the Mouth

Salivary Flow: As we’ve seen, salivary flow is directly related to the amount of work being done in the mouth. This means that if you are eating a very soft food or chewing on a very soft food, you will produce less saliva.

On the other hand, if you are eating something firmer, such as a steak, you are likely to produce more saliva. Fluids in the Oral Cavity: The amount of fluid in the oral cavity is also a self-regulating process. It is directly related to the amount of food that is in the oral cavity.

This means that when you eat something sticky or very soft, it is likely to stay in the oral cavity for a shorter amount of time.

Gingival Swelling: When you are stressed or nervous, your gums become swollen. This is a self-regulating process that allows gums to remain healthy and bacteria-free. In addition, it can be used as an indicator of your stress levels.

Conclusion

The oral cavity is a very complex and delicate system. It is essential that all of its parts function properly in order for us to remain healthy. Unfortunately, the oral cavity is a very complicated system.

It is very dependent on active participation from us in order to function properly. Nevertheless, it is also a very sensitive system, so we need to be careful not to overstep our boundaries and interfere with its natural balance.

If you are interested in improving your oral health, start with what you put into your mouth. Make sure that you are eating a healthy diet that includes plenty of fresh and whole foods. Cut back on sugary and salty foods, and drink plenty of water to stay hydrated. Doing these things will help you promote a healthy oral environment.

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