10 High Paying Jobs in the Nursing Field

High Paying Nursing Jobs – Careers in the nursing industry are some of the highest paid professions. There are many jobs that will pay you well and meet your needs. For job seekers, nurses are among the most sought-after professionals. Across all industries, a lack of qualified doctors and nurses means that there is an increased demand for workers in this field. With so many benefits, it’s no wonder nursing is one of the most popular career paths to take! Ready to see which jobs pay off? Keep reading to find out what they are!

10 High Paying Jobs in the Nursing Field - Best School News

Sometimes, the only thing that can motivate somebody to find a new job is higher pay. The good news is that there are many high-paying nursing jobs out there if you know where to look. To help you find the best positions for your area and skill set, we’ve compiled a list of the top 10 highest paying nursing jobs.
For instance, Registered Nurse (RN) positions have a median annual salary of $68,450 in 2017. That’s more than $34,000 above the national average for all occupations. If you want to make more money while still providing an invaluable service to those in need, consider one of these ten high paying nursing jobs today!

10 high Paying nursing jobs

There are many nursing career options to consider depending on your interests and specialty areas. The salaries listed below were obtained from Indeed job searches and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). Here are 10 high-paying positions to consider:

1. Nurse practitioner (NP)

National average salary: The BLS lists salaries up to $117,670 per year. It predicts that jobs for nurse practitioners will grow by 45% by 2030.

Primary duties: A nurse practitioner is a health care professional who assists in several aspects of patient care including conducting and interpreting diagnostic tests such as X-rays and lab work, diagnosing conditions, creating treatment plans and consulting with patients and their families. They may work in a clinic or hospital or independently in private practice.

Education: To become a nurse practitioner, you must first obtain a Bachelor of Science in nursing (BSN) degree and become a registered nurse (RN). You will then need to earn a Master of Science degree in nursing (MSN). Individual states set NP licensure requirements, so make sure to search for your state’s NP requirements.

2. Clinical nurse specialist (CNS)

National average salary: $85,491 per year. Although the BLS does not report specific data regarding the job outlook of clinical nurse specialists, it does predict that overall employment of registered nurses will grow 9% by 2030.

See also  Union Construction Jobs in 2022 - Get a Job and Make a Living.

Primary duties: A clinical nurse specialist is an advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) who cares for patients in a clinical setting. They typically work with nursing staff and patient care managers to provide education and optimize patient care efforts. They may evaluate patient care plans, complete research to find alternative treatments and provide recommendations to help improve patient outcomes.

Education: An MSN degree is required with an emphasis on clinical nursing. After you complete at least 500 faculty-supervised clinical hours, you can take a certification exam relevant to clinical nursing offered by the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) or the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses​​. You can then apply for state CNS certification.

3. Clinical nurse educator (CNE)

National average salary: $90,042 per year.Although the BLS does not report specific data regarding the job outlook of clinical nurse specialists, it does predict that overall employment of registered nurses will grow 9% by 2030.

Primary duties: Clinical nurse educators are responsible for training nursing professionals within health care facilities. They develop a training curriculum and oversee new nurses and nursing school students in a clinical setting. They may work within a hospital or educational institution.

Education: An MSN with an educational specialization is recommended although a BSN is typically a minimum educational requirement. You can strengthen your credibility as a nurse educator by earning optional nursing educator certifications. Relevant certifications for nursing educators include certified nurse educator (CNE) and certified academic nurse educator (CNE-CL).

4. Psychiatric nurse practitioner

National average salary: The BLS lists salaries up to $117,670 per year. It predicts that jobs for nurse practitioners will grow by 45% by 2030.

Primary duties: Psychiatric nurse practitioners, also called mental health nurse practitioners, are APRNs who evaluate patients to diagnose mental illnesses, assist in treatment planning and prescribe medication. They also work to educate patients and their families about their mental illness diagnosis and treatment options. They may work as part of a hospital’s mental health unit or for independent practices.

Education: After obtaining an APRN degree, you can pursue a specialty as a psychiatric nurse practitioner. Steps include entering an MSN/NP program that offers a program to become a psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner. Next, earn the psychiatric-mental health nurse practitioner certification offered by ANCC.

5. Pain management nurse

National average salary: $102,143 per year. Although the BLS does not report specific data regarding the job outlook of pain management nurses, it does predict that overall employment of registered nurses will grow 9% by 2030.

Primary duties: Pain management nurses often work within hospital oncology units, palliative care or hospice programs to help identify the cause of a patient’s pain and help prepare a care plan. They may also work as advocates to help get the patient’s medication or as liaisons for vocational programs to help patients manage pain when returning to work.

See also  How Online Ordering Systems Can Save Your Business Money

Education: Pain management nurses must have at least a BSN. After two years as a full-time RN, you can sit for the registered nurse-board certified (RN-BC) credential in the specialty of pain management offered by ANCC. Requirements include at least 2,000 hours in a nursing role that incorporates pain management in the past three years.

6. Nursing home administrator (NHA)

National average salary: The BLS lists salaries up to $104,280 per year. It predicts that jobs for medical and health services managers, including nursing home managers, will grow 32% by 2030.

Primary duties: An NHA combines experience and education in health care with business skills to supervise and manage daily operations within nursing home facilities. They may hire and train staff, handle finances and assist with patient care.

Related: What Is an Endocrinologist?

Education: The minimum level of education required is a BSN although many NHAs earn master’s degrees to get the skills to run a health care facility. Certifications and licenses by federal and state jurisdictions are also important. Long-term facility care is a specialized skill that requires the NHA to stay current on any issues that may occur and to handle matters knowledgeably and professionally.

7. Advanced practice registered nurse (APRN)

National average salary: The BLS lists salaries up to $117,670 per year. It predicts that jobs for nurse practitioners will grow 45% by 2030.

Primary duties: APRNs serve as primary care providers, health education professionals and providers of preventive, acute and specialty care. These advanced medical professionals are important to the health care system. They may diagnose patients, prescribe medication and develop patient care plans. An APRN is an RN who’s pursued advanced training in a specialized area. They may work as nurse practitioners, nurse anesthetists, clinical nurse specialists, nurse midwives or in other advanced roles.

Education: To become a nurse practitioner, you must first obtain a BSN and become an RN. You then must earn a MSN or a Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) degree. To become state-licensed as an APRN, you can first obtain the national certification that aligns with your chosen APRN role and population focus. The ANCC administers certification for nurse practitioners and clinical nurse specialists while certification for nurse anesthetists is offered by the National Board of Certification & Recertification for Nurse Anesthetists (NBCRNA). Certification for nurse-midwives can be obtained through the American Midwifery Certification Board (AMCB).

See also  20 High Paying Careers in Law Enforcement

8. Medical-surgical nurse manager

National average salary: $117,180 per yearThe BLS predicts that jobs for medical and health services managers, including medical-surgical nurse managers, will grow by 32% by 2030.

Primary duties: Medical-surgical nurse managers provide care to patients who are preparing for or recovering from surgery. They provide direction and administrative oversight to medical care teams and plan and lead nursing care within a hospital setting. They may oversee staffing and training of more junior health care employees such as RNs, monitor and respond to changes in patient volume and ensure the care team adheres to all hospital policies and procedures.

Education: The minimum level of education required is a BSN although many earn master’s degrees to get the skills to run a medical-surgical facility. Most state boards require certification. The American Organization of Nurse Executives offers two applicable certifications for nurse managers: certified nurse manager and leader (CNML) and certified in executive nursing practice (CENP).

9. Certified registered nurse anesthetist (CRNA)

National average salary: $117,670 per year. The BLS predicts that jobs for CRNAs will grow 45% by 2030.

Primary duties: Certified registered nurse anesthetists are APRNs who deliver anesthesia and pain care services such as epidurals and nerve blocks. They may work with surgeons, anesthesiologists, podiatrists, dentists and other health care professionals to help prepare a patient for a procedure, assist in stabilization and monitor patients during postoperative recovery.

Read: How To Become an Endocrinologist

Education: To become a CRNA, you must first obtain a BSN and become a RN. You then must earn a MSN or a Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) degree. To become state-licensed as CRNA, you can obtain a CRNA certification offered by the NBCRNA.

10. Family nurse practitioner (FNP)

National average salary: $126,895 per year.

Primary duties: Family nurse practitioners deliver family-focused care. FNPs are often the primary care provider for families, which means they order diagnostic tests, diagnose and treat acute and chronic illnesses in patients from childhood through adulthood, prescribe medications and teach patients how to achieve healthier lifestyles for optimal health.

Education: To become a family nurse practitioner, you must first obtain a BSN and become a RN. You must then earn a MSN or a DNP. To become state-licensed as a FNP, you can first obtain the national certification. The top boards include ANCC, American Academy of Nurse Practitioners (AANP) and American Nurses Association (ANA).

Related careers

Related Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.